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Network Europe

Published söndag 5 november 2006 kl 05.30
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Down and out in France?
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Silent memorial march in Clichy-sous-Bois, northeastern Paris for two youths whose death sparked fiery suburban riots that shook France last year
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Mobile telephony circa 1956. Bend your knees!

This week:

As the EU expands, is the welcome we offer our neighbours contracting?

Are German-Polish relations back on track?

How the UK is dealing with its biggest wave of migration in history.

What’s life like in Spain for the Polish migrant?

French and disadvantaged? Come and vote!

The mobile phone turns 50!

More:

As Europe expands, is the welcome we offer our neighbours contracting?

Do Europeans need or want to get any closer together? As Romania and Bulgaria prepare to join the EU in 2 months time we look at how they’re being welcomed, or not.

Europe’s getting bigger all the time and our leaders in Brussels are keen for it to keep expanding. And there are plenty of states keen to join. Turkey and several Balkan states are currently front of the queue to start negotiations.

What some predict will happen then is a mass-migration as east Europeans seek better wages as they go west.

So what do Europeans think of the expansion and the prospect of the continent experiencing a massive labour force on the move? Network Europe’s reporters have been out on the streets of the capitals to find out...

Are German-Polish relations back on track?

During his first official visit to Germany, Polish prime minister Jaroslaw Kaczynski, addressed a number of issues which he said were continuing to raise concerns back home. In his talks with German chancellor Angela Merkel, the Polish guest was particularly outspoken about fears that a planned German-Russian pipeline bypassing Poland might negatively impact his country’s energy security in the decades ahead. The meeting in the chancellery was meant to improve bilateral relations which had turned increasingly sour since Jaroslaw Kaczynski’s nationalist Law and Order party took power about a year ago.

One of the biggest migrations in UK history!

A recent poll in Britain found that eight out of 10 people believed migrants took jobs from British workers and 39% said, in most cases, a migrant worker’s job represented one less job for the British workforce. An open-door policy for migrants doesn’t therefore seem like a vote-winner. We don’t know exactly what effects these workers have on their host country but one thing’s for sure they are coming and Britain says it’s closing the door. Network Europe has been finding out what effect the massive Polish immigartion wave has been having on Britain.

Life in Spain for the Polish migrant

Since Spain opened its labour market to workers from the new EU member states Poles have been searching for jobs there. But Spaniards are beginning to fear the influx of migrant workers more and more, despite the fact unemployment between July and September hit its lowest point in 27 years. Poles used to take up just seasonal jobs, but now, many of them have decided to stay for good. Netwrok Europe has been meeting some migrant workers on their tea breaks.

French and disadvantaged? Come and vote!

The starting point for all discussions about deprived suburbs and the violence they suffer is still the rioting in Paris last year that stunned Europe. The problems that led to those incidents have not gone away. Most young people of north African origin living in France’s deprived suburbs, as French citizens, are entitled to vote. But a nationwide campaign launched last year has failed to convince young people to go and register to vote en masse.Many of them say politicians are out of touch with their lives. Network Europe found out why.

The mobile phone turns 50!

Sweden is a proud parent this year, its baby is turning 50. Network Europe reports on the world’s first fully automated mobile telephone system.

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Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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