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Network Europe

Published söndag 12 november 2006 kl 05.21
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The saga continues..

This week:

Brussels bristles with criticism of Turkey

Romania waiting for the windfall

Europe delights in Turkish army?

Brussels Briefing

Overseas students in the UK

The Scania - M.A.N - VW saga

More:

Brussels bristles with criticism of Turkey

Turkey’s chances of joining the exclusive EU club took another downturn this week. The issue of whether Turkey joins the EU has become one of the most divisive issues in european political life. The question many want answered is if it were to become a member, would Turkey become more European or would, as some western Europeans fear, Europe become less secular? The European commission released a much anticpated report on Turkey’s accession progress on Wednesday and it didn’t make for cosey bed-time reading for Ankara. Turkey was attacked on its human rights, religious freedoms and its attitude towards the divided island of Cyprus. There wasn’t a call for a suspension of talks but the report’s bound to fuel speculation that Turkey’s whole bid is going off the rails.

Romania waiting for the windfall

There’s been much talk about what EU integration will bring to Romania. Money of course is one thing. There’ll be more funds than Romania can probably absorb. Then there’s a the huge number of regulations and standards that must be complied with. That’s what the average Romanian knows about the European Union. What fewer Romanians ask themselves is what Romania will bring to the EU.

Europe delights in Turkish army?

As Turkey chews over what more it needs to do to win EU membership, the Turkish army’s flexing its muscles in domestic politics.The chief of staff has warned prime minister Tayyip Erdogan that the secular state is facing a threat from fundamentalist Islam. The prime minister’s in a difficult situation because conservative muslims form the backbone of his support. But the Turkish army, along with the middle class, fiercely defend the separation of state and religion - something many in the EU would applaud.

Brussels Briefing

What does the European Commission’s report on Turkey’s chances of joining the EU mean? Our man in Brussels dissects the list of do’s and don’t’s Turkey’s been given to work on.

Overseas students in the UK

A recent study revealed a massive increase in the number of overseas students enrolling at universities in the UK. In fact, the number has more than doubled since the mid 1990s. What’s led to this huge rise, and what impact is it having on university education in the UK?

Scania, M.A.N and Volkswagen - What next?

Two former colleagues, now at the head of their own industrial giants, fight to become number one even as both face being bought -up and dismantled by a huge industrial conglomerate

It Sounds like a 1980’s television mini-series - but its all part of the mix in an industrial saga that is being played out in Europe this week, as Swedish truck makers Scania - and German truckmaker M.A.Nare being ushered to merge by a third party matchmaker - Volkswagen.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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