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Radio Sweden Thursday

Published torsdag 30 november 2006 kl 11.01
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U.N. Swedish peacekeepers watch smoke and dust caused during a mine clearance operation at the southern Lebanese village of Hamames, near the Lebanon-Israeli border, in November, 2000
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Polonium scare reaches Sweden

Coming up today:

The UK-radiation scare hits Sweden as it comes to light that a British airliner to Stockholm was contaminated with the same highly poisonous radioactive substance, polonium-210, linked to the death of ex-Russian spy, Alexander Litvinenko.

Should debt relief to developing countries be part of international development assistance? A political row errupts between the government and the main opposition.

Also - It’s 50 years this month since Swedish troops began their first ever UN peacekeeping duties abroad. We speak to Swedish peacekeepers about their experiences abroad.

Closing music: ”I samma bil” (In the same car), Bo Kaspers Orchestra

Passengers who travelled to or from London Heathrow to Stockholm on a British Airways Boeing 767 between the dates November the 3rd to the 24th this month are being urged to contact the airline after low traces of a radioactive substance thought to have poisoned and killed the ex-spy Alexander Litvinenko were reported to have been found. Dave Russell has more:

A row has erupted between the government and the main opposition Social Democrats over how international development co-operation should be calculated. As Azariah Kiros reports, the controversy is over whether debt relief should be part of development assistance or not:

It’s 50 years this month since Swedish troops began their first ever UN peacekeeping duties abroad. Since that mission to the Middle East, around 100,000 Swedish soldiers have been sent to conflict zones around the world. At the launch of a new book to mark the anniversary, our reporter Tom McAlinden has been speaking to former servicemen who took part in some of the first missions, and in more recent ones:

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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