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Inside Sweden

Published fredag 22 december 2006 kl 11.42
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Queen Silvia at the 1997 Nobel banquet
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A landmark ruling on ethnic quotas! One of the state’s top lawyers gives us his view.

Sometimes known as Sweden’s ”most famous immigrant” - Queen Silvia celebrates her birthday this weekend. We speak to an author of a new book showing Silvia’s more glamorous side.

And in our Discovery series Judi Milar has more on Sweden’s efforts to help Liberia get back on its feet, both from the government and grass-roots initiatives.

Closing Music: Bing Crosby ”White Christmas”

On Thursday, Sweden’s Supreme Court ruled that Uppsala University was guilty of discriminating against Swedish applicants to its law course by operating a quota system where it reserved places for less qualified people with an immigrant background. The court’s decision is the final ruling on the case brought by two women, who were rejected from the course in 2003, even though they had better marks than all 30 successful immigrant applicants. The Supreme Court ruled that setting quotas is acceptable but only as long as applicants are treated equally. Göran Lambertz is the chancellor of justice of Sweden. Dave Russel asked him how he interpreted the ruling:

On Saturday, people all over Sweden will see flags raised high. Not for the holidays, but to honor the birthday of Queen Silvia. Sometimes known as Sweden’s ”most famous immigrant,” her majesty celebrated 30 years as Queen of Sweden this year. And now a new book has just come out to show Silvia’s more glamorous side. Juan Navas filed this report:

Few can forget the horrors of the Liberian Civil War, which erupted at the close of 1989.  It was a war marked by unspeakable brutality, corruption, interference from neighboring countries, false promises from the international community and worst of all, a generation of children uneducated and without proper nutrition. Judi Milar has more on Sweden’s efforts to help Liberia get back on its feet, both from the government and grass-roots initiatives.


 

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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