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Inside Sweden

Published fredag 27 juli 2007 kl 11.10
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A protest in Stockholm last year after a temporary law which gave underground refugees a second chance to apply for residency came to an end.
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Moving in, moving around and moving out....

One of Sweden’s well-known agony aunts tells us how tough it was for her to start a new life in this Scandinavian country as a child.

As a recent report reveals that more people than ever are packing their bags and relocating to other parts of Sweden, we find out why some people go against the trend and abandon the big city neon for the Northern Lights.

And new figures give an indication of what effect a recent temporary asylum law has had for refugees living underground in Sweden, but we look at how many foreign-born residents are leaving the country - for good.

Closing Music: Abba, ”I Have a Dream”

Newly released statistics show both a record immigration to Sweden and migration out of Sweden. The figures don’t show just how many foreign-born residents in Sweden leave the country – permanently, as Bill Schiller finds out from a statistics expert:

”Summer Child” is a new book that describes a happy childhood lost in a country far from the author’s new home and school, and the bullies that toughened her skin. Katerina Janouch, best known as a relationship expert and agony aunt, tells Gaby Katz about her childhood - both happy and unhappy:


Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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