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Nobel Prizes

Nobel Prize for Medicine Goes to Father of Test-Tube Babies

Published måndag 4 oktober 2010 kl 09.50
Robert Edwards will receive more than one million U.S. dollars as this year's Nobel laureate in medicine. This is the first time in more than a decade that the prize was awarded to a sole winner.

The 2010 Nobel Prize for Medicine has gone to British research, Robert Edwards, known as the father of invitro fertilization.

Born in Manchester, England in 1925 Robert Edwards started his research in 1958 as a scientist at the National Institute for Medical Research. Twenty years later Louise Brown, the first so called test tube baby, was born. Now, at the age of 32, she is only one of 4 million children who have been conceived using IFV treatment.

In Sweden nearly 3.000 children are conceived through IVF treatment and in most western countries between 1 and 2 percent of all children are test tube babies.

According to Bo Angelin, a member of the Nobel Assembly and of the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences Edwards received the award since the discovery has had a great impact in the world especially for childless couples.

Announcements of the laureates in physics, chemistry, literature and peace will follow throughout the rest of the week. An award ceremony for the prizes will take place in December in Stockholm. The exception is the Nobel Peace Prize, awarded in Oslo, Norway.

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