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Internet freedom and activism

Sweden and its relationship with the Internet

Published fredag 28 oktober 2011 kl 14.28
"Main issue to save and protect the Internet we have now"
(8:23 min)

The Internet is increasingly prevalent in people’s lives both in Sweden and around the world. But how free and open is the Internet and what is Sweden’s relationship with it?

Marcin de Kaminski works with a range of issues related to the Internet. For his PhD at Lund University he is conducting social and legal research concerning the Internet, looking at the clashes between the Internet and the offline world. De Kaminski is also a so called net activist and through the NGO, The Julia Group, is working for a free and open internet around the world.

The academic and activist tells Radio Sweden that he is worried about the trend of big business and media increasingly regulating the Internet and that we must be vigilant and fight for a free and open net.

De Kaminski sees Sweden as having “an exceptional reputation” and a “free and open mind” when it comes to Internet law and regulation, and describes the country as a haven for both individual internet activists and larger organisations such as Wikileaks.

Sweden’s liberal politics and tradition of human rights coupled with its technical capabilities mean the country is ideally positioned for net activists to support people abroad fighting for democratic change and rights, says De Kaminski.

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