Internet service provider deletes all records

Jon Karlung. Foto: TT
Jon Karlung is the CEO of the internet service provider Bahnhof, and has protested against the data retention laws. Photo: TT

After the decision in the European Court of Justice on Tuesday, the internet service provider Bahnhof decided to delete the records and to stop retaining the data with immediate effect.

Published tisdag 8 april kl 17:59

After the decision in the European Court of Justice on Tuesday, the internet service provider Bahnhof decided to delete the records and to stop retaining the data with immediate effect.

The court annulled the Data Retention Directive from 2006, which oblige mobile and broadband companies to retain records on computer and telephone communications for six months. The CEO of Bahnhof welcomes the decision.

"This is a big victory for everybody who have fought for personal integrity and against the indiscriminate laws about mass interception of the whole population," CEO Jon Karlung told Swedish Radio News.

The directive was incorporated into Swedish law in 2012 after a vigorous and lengthy debate here. The delay in doing so led to Sweden being fined SEK 27 million.

The directive allows member states to store phone and computer communications, even though no crime is being suspected. Now the European Court has decided that the directive goes against EU law, as it does not sufficiently take into account the personal integrity of the citizens.

The court does not rule out data retention as illegal, but says it must be proportionate and may only be used in exceptional cases. In response to the decision, Justice Minister Beatrice Ask says this may  lead to a review of the Swedish law.

"Of course there will be consequences. At the moment we are analysing what the court has said and will draw conclusions about the consequences for Sweden and the EU after that," Ask told Swedish Radio.

But the minister is not pleased about Bahnhof's decision to stop all data retention immediately. "Swedish law still applies. It is not the case that you can start applying other conditions straight away. But of course we need to quickly consider what the consequences are so that everybody can get the right information," she said.

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