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Tears and calm as border checks continue

Published fredag 13 november 2015 kl 11.14
"I've seen people crying a lot when they understand what is happening"
(3:49 min)
Police along the platform of Hyllie station in southern Malmö. Photo: Anna-Lotta Hirvonen Nyström/Sveriges Radio Sisuradio.
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Police along the platform of Hyllie station in southern Malmö. Photo: Anna-Lotta Hirvonen Nyström/Sveriges Radio Sisuradio.
Police along the platform of Hyllie station in southern Malmö. Photo: Anna-Lotta Hirvonen Nyström/Sveriges Radio Sisuradio.
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Police along the platform of Hyllie station in southern Malmö. Photo: Anna-Lotta Hirvonen Nyström/Sveriges Radio Sisuradio.

Checks at Sweden's southern border continue on Friday after the government reinstated controls Thursday afternoon to establish control over the wave of migrants arriving in the country.

Officers with the Swedish police force are checking passports and other identification documents of travelers crossing into Sweden from Denmark and Germany.

Officials say some 30 to 50 refugees and migrants were turned back after not having proper ID or the right to enter Sweden. 

Police also say between 500 and 600 people have sought asylum in Sweden since the introduction of the temporary border controls. The Migration Agency says 1,600 have sought asylum in Sweden, in the past 24 hours. 

At Hyllie station, a railway station south of central Malmö and the first stop after the Danish border, reporters saw police checking nearly every passenger for identification and escorting those without off the train.

Several of them were upset and crying when they learned what was happening but no altercations broke out.

"I must say that I'm surprised that this is such a calm border control even though it's very intense," Swedish Radio News reporter Claes Aronsson says.

Aronsson says most Malmö residents were prepared for the random checks and took them in stride. He says though if the checks continue for longer than their 10-day time frame attitudes among residents, police and refugees may change.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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