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Questions raised over terror suspect's arrest

Published fredag 20 november 2015 kl 20.02
"That's the first place the police will look"
(1:53 min)
Police cars in Boliden, where the arrest took place. Photo: Robert Granström / TT.
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Police cars in Boliden, where the arrest took place. Photo: Robert Granström / TT.
The suspect's name was on the door to his apartment building. Photo: Åsa Sundman / Sveriges Radio.
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The suspect's name was on the door to his apartment building. Photo: Åsa Sundman / Sveriges Radio.
The suspect Moder Mothama Magid, also known as Mutar Muthanna Majid. Photo: SVT.
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The suspect Moder Mothama Magid, also known as Mutar Muthanna Majid. Photo: SVT.

As more details emerge about the young man police detained for plotting a terror attack in Sweden, some are raising doubts or remain unconvinced he is a danger to the country.

Moder Mothama Magid, who has also been identified as Mutar Muthanna Majid in Swedish media, was arrest Thursday afternoon in the northern town of Boliden on suspicion of preparation to commit a terrorist offence following a nationwide manhunt during the day.

Swedish prosecutor Hans Ihrman alleged Mothama Magid was plotting a terrorist attack in Stockholm. The 22-year-old was arrested on "good grounds" of planning an attack, the second lowest of four levels of criminal suspicion in the Sweden legal system.

But Mothama Magid's actions and accounts from family and friends has left some skeptical about his arrest. Terrorism expert Magnus Norell told Swedish Radio News he found it odd the man would have his name on the door to his apartment, a refugee housing complex run by Sweden's Migration Agency.

"It doesn't feel like he's trying to avoid being detected," he told Swedish Radio News.

Newspaper Expressen also spoke with Mothama Magid's mother in the Iraqi town of Mosul. She said her son fled the town when the Islamic State began attacking in 2013. 

"We saved up money so our son could get out of here," she told the newspaper.

She said her son was not capable of carrying out a criminal act and called upon Swedish authorities to sort out the "misunderstanding".

"My son has nothing to do with Daesh," the mother said, using an alternative name for the Islamist group.

Her son's public Facebook page, since taken offline, also doesn't reveal any affinities with radical Islamists. His profile showed him liking the US Army, US President Barack Obama, US news outlets and a Facebook group called "I Love Sweden" as well as a page for his local grocery store in Boliden. He also had Facebook friends who are Shia Muslims, whom IS believes are apostates, writes Expressen.

Friend of Mothama Magid also came to his defense. Speaking with newspaper Aftonbladet, an unidentified man who was a neighbor to Mothama Magid at the refugee housing said he had a hard time believing Mothama Magid was a member of IS. 

(The 22-year-old was later released and freed from all suspicion).

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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