Du måste aktivera javascript för att sverigesradio.se ska fungera korrekt och för att kunna lyssna på ljud. Har du problem med vår sajt så finns hjälp på http://kundo.se/org/sverigesradio/

More than baking behind gingerbread exhibit

Published onsdag 2 december 2015 kl 11.47
"Other people have used this to make a social statement"
(2:13 min)
Some of the houses feature iconic Stockholm buildings, like the Kaknäs Tower in the foreground. Photo: Frank Radosevich / Radio Sweden.
1 av 4
Some of the houses feature iconic Stockholm buildings, like the Kaknäs Tower in the foreground. Photo: Frank Radosevich / Radio Sweden.
A gingerbread house that offers a take on migration in Europe. Photo: Frank Radosevich / Radio Sweden.
2 av 4
A gingerbread house that offers a take on migration in Europe. Photo: Frank Radosevich / Radio Sweden.
One entry took a stab at having life under the sea. Photo: Frank Radosevich / Radio Sweden.
3 av 4
One entry took a stab at having life under the sea. Photo: Frank Radosevich / Radio Sweden.
The winner of the competition will be awarded on Dec. 19. Photo: Frank Radosevich / Radio Sweden.
4 av 4
The winner of the competition will be awarded on Dec. 19. Photo: Frank Radosevich / Radio Sweden.

Stockholm's Architecture and Design Museum unveiled its 25th annual Gingerbread House competition and exhibition on Wednesday, encouraging bakers to take a new look at how to design the Christmas tradition.

Stefan Mossfeldt is the curator of the exhibition and says this year's theme focuses on "how to find new places to live." 

Mossfeldt says some took that literally, building gingerbread houses underwater, in outer space or ones that resembled a Native American teepee. Others interpreted it as a more abstract concept.

He says most gingerbread house competitions are about baking techniques or complicated design but that Stockholm's allows for people to make statements on society.

"That's the point of the theme every year to make it possible for people to have very different ways to view the theme and come up with different ideas," Mossfeldt tells Radio Sweden.

Bakers of all ages can submit an entry and must use only edible materials, though Mossfeldt says the museum is not so strict on observing that rule. This year people could even build their gingerbread house at home and submit a digital picture of it to the museum.

He says some competitors get creative with the construction, using unboiled spaghetti or dry rye bread to strength the walls.

"You use them like reinforcement in concrete," he says.

At the end of the show, those wanting their creation back have a week to pick it up while the rest are smashed and recycled as food waste.

"Its no problem finding people who will come as volunteers for that task," Mossfeldt adds about the destruction of the houses.

The exhibit is free and open to the public until January 10.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
Har du frågor eller förslag gällande våra webbtjänster?

Kontakta gärna Sveriges Radios supportforum där vi besvarar dina frågor vardagar kl. 9-17.

Du hittar dina sparade avsnitt i menyn under "Min lista".