Du måste aktivera javascript för att sverigesradio.se ska fungera korrekt och för att kunna lyssna på ljud. Har du problem med vår sajt så finns hjälp på http://kundo.se/org/sverigesradio/

Sweden to step up deporting failed asylum seekers

Published torsdag 3 december 2015 kl 10.20
Home Affairs Minister Anders Ygeman visiting border police at Malmö's Hyllie train station near the Danish border. Photo: Stig-Åke Jönsson / TT.
Home Affairs Minister Anders Ygeman visiting border police at Malmö's Hyllie train station near the Danish border. Photo: Stig-Åke Jönsson / TT.

Authorities are redoubling their efforts to deport asylum seekers in Sweden whose applications have been turned down, newspaper Dagens Nyheter reports, saying more than 10,000 failed asylum cases have been handed over to the police so far this year.

Police in southern Sweden are recruiting more officers to double the number of border police handling deportation cases. Law enforcement officials say they hope to have 150 police officers in the region working exclusively on repatriating those ineligible for asylum.

Jarl Holmström, deputy police chief in the region, said police have already seen an increase in the number of cases, which can take months before they are resolved.

In total, police have 22,000 cases where people are to be forcibly deported from Sweden.

Police are also considering getting involved with asylum applications earlier on so that if one is rejected, officers have a better understanding of what measures need to be taken.

"The sooner we come into the picture, the lower the risk of people running off," said Patrik Engström, head of border police at the Swedish Police's National Operations Division.

Tomorrow, Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven will meet with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani in Stockholm to hammer out an agreement on returning rejected asylum seeker back to the central Asian country. Dagens Nyheter reports, however, that an agreement is unlikely to come tomorrow.

"We politicians must do more to get these agreements in place, partly through the European Union via Frontex (the EU's border agency), and partly through Sweden signing separate agreements with countries," Home Affairs Minister Anders Ygeman told the newspaper.

Another measure that both the police and the government are looking into is stationing police liaison officers in a number of countries where bureaucracy can be an obstacle for people who are returning.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
Har du frågor eller förslag gällande våra webbtjänster?

Kontakta gärna Sveriges Radios supportforum där vi besvarar dina frågor vardagar kl. 9-17.

Du hittar dina sparade avsnitt i menyn under "Min lista".