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More police are quitting the force

Published tisdag 22 mars 2016 kl 11.29
Updated tisdag 22 mars 2016 kl 18.29
"It's difficult to combine with private life where you have family and children"
(3:33 min)
Maja Suslin / TT.
Credit: Maja Suslin / TT.

More and more police are quitting the force because of poor pay and tougher working conditions. During 2015, 832 police dropped out compared with 678 in 2014.

Daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter reports that the increased rate of turnover has held steady for the first two months of 2016 with 144 police leaving the agency.

"We're taking these numbers seriously and are keeping track of this development month by month," said Kajsa Möller, the human resources director for the police, speaking with Dagens Nyheter.

She added that while fewer police are being trained the force is still able to do its job. "There's no panic," she told the newspaper.

Most of those who quit the force were nearing the end of their careers and had already turned 60. But the greatest change in the drop-out numbers was among police who were under 40 years of age. In 2010, only 33 officers under 40 quit the force. In 2015, there were 121.

Two reasons cited by Anna Nellberg Dennis, the first vice chair of the Swedish Police Union, are a low salary and the recent reorganization of the police force.

She tells Radio Sweden that morale is low among the ranks.

"We are understaffed at so many levels and the workload is very high," she says.

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