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Swedish opposition "lacks new ideas"

Published tisdag 3 maj 2016 kl 13.35
Ewa Stenberg: They have two big problems
(2:34 min)
The Alliance party leaders, from left to right: Jan Björklund (Liberal Party), Annie Lööf (Centre Party, Anna Kinberg Batra (Moderate Party) and Ebba Busch Thor (Christian Democrats).
The Alliance party leaders, from left to right: Jan Björklund (Liberal Party), Annie Lööf (Centre Party, Anna Kinberg Batra (Moderate Party) and Ebba Busch Thor (Christian Democrats). Photo: Yvonne Åsell/SvD/TT

Having been in opposition since the 2014 election, the four centre-right Alliance parties have this year chosen to present their shadow spring budgets separately, revealing new differences among each other.

“I think the differences have grown, because there are some differences in the migration policy that haven’t existed before. And there are also some differences in how to spend the money and organise the military defence, and about the taxes and about the crisis in Swedish schools,” Ewa Stenberg, political commentator at the newspaper Dagens Nyheter, told Radio Sweden.

For instance, the Liberals want to see more spending on the armed forces than what has already been agreed to by the red-green government and the other Alliance parties. When it comes to migration, the four Alliance parties have all proposed different budget measures, with the Centre Party notably having presented a proposal for loans instead of benefits for newly-arrived immigrants, reports Dagens Nyheter.

But in spite of these differences, Ewa Stenberg thinks the Alliance, which is comprised of the conservative Moderates, the Liberals, the Christian Democrats and the Centre Party, have bigger problems right now.

“They have two big problems. The first, and the biggest, is the lack of new ideas. And the second problem is the lack of strategy,” Stenberg said, adding, "now is the time to rebuild some new ideas, and some new stories that they can tell the voters about the future Sweden they want."

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