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Author Meg Rosoff doesn't "mind the gap" between British and American English

Published måndag 30 maj 2016 kl 11.19
Meg Rosoff: Squishy woo-woo
(6:08 min)
Meg Rosoff is being awarded the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award for "sparkling prose" in her young adult novels. Photo: Brett Ascarelli / Radio Sweden
Meg Rosoff is being awarded the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award for "sparkling prose" in her young adult novels. Photo: Brett Ascarelli / Radio Sweden

On Monday, the American-born author, Meg Rosoff will be at the Stockholm Concert Hall to receive the Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, billed as the world's largest children's literature award.


The jury's citation read:

"Meg Rosoff's young adult novels speak to the emotions as well as the intellect. In sparkling prose, she writes about the search for meaning and identity in a peculiar and bizarre world. Her brave and humorous stories are one-of-a-kind. She leaves no reader unmoved."

Rosoff's written several young adult novels, including How I Live Now, which begins when a teenager from New York gets sent off to live with her cousins in the UK, during a fictional third world war. That was made into a film. Another of her novels, Vamoose! concerns a pregnant teenager who gives birth to a baby moose.

Radio Sweden caught up with Meg Rosoff during the award week to find out about how she uses language, as an American writer living in the UK.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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