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Trio's work in molecular machines wins Chemistry Nobel

Updated onsdag 5 oktober 2016 kl 13.16
Published onsdag 5 oktober 2016 kl 11.30
Bernard L Feringa: Think about micro machines, think about micro robots
(1:42 min)
The Nobel jury announces the winners of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
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The Nobel jury announces the winners of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Credit: Henrik Montgomery / TT.
A display prior to the official announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry.
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A display prior to the official announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry. Credit: Jonathan Nackstrand / AFP / TT.

The 2016 Chemistry Nobel Prize goes to professors Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa for "the design and synthesis of molecular machines”.

Frank Radosevich, producer, Radio Sweden: Hello all, it's day three in Nobel season and time for the prize in chemistry. We expect the announcement at 11:45 a.m. Stockholm time at the earlist.

11:16, 5 October 2016

Frank Radosevich, producer, Radio Sweden: There have been 107 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry handed out over the years and so far only 4 of them have been awarded to women.

11:18, 5 October 2016

NobelPrize: Join us LIVE from Stockholm – Announcement of the 2016 #NobelPrize in Chemistry soon at 11:45 am Tell your friends! https://t.co/zklZKGqlPO

11:19, 5 October 2016

UllaEngbergRS: Last year, a Swede was among the winners of the Chemistry Prize, for discoveries about how DNA can repair itself. W… https://t.co/Zh7vuisYPa

11:29, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: We're around ten minutes away from the announcement of this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry. We'll have interviews and analysis.

11:36, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: Tuesday's physics prize went to three Brits, working in the US. Americans have missed out so far this year.

11:38, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: One of yesterday's three physics laureates heard the news while sitting in a car in an underground carpark in Finland.

11:40, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: I wonder if any pastries will be brought out to explain the science today. Maybe a bunsen burner or two!

11:42, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: The final Nobel awarded from Stockholm this week. Remember Literature will come next week. peace prize from Oslo on Friday

11:46, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: here they come...drum roll...

11:46, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: The 2016 Nobel prize in Chemistry is about the world's smallest machine

11:48, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: Chemistry prize to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Sir J. Fraser Stoddart and Bernard L. Feringa

11:49, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: Here's the background - Read the story on how molecules became machines: http://goo.gl/MGWuKu #NobelPrize

11:50, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: The 2016 #Chemistry Laureates succeeded in linking molecules together to design a tiny lift, motors & miniscule muscles #NobelPrize

11:50, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: The Chemistry prize was announced in four languages. The laureates are from France, netherlands and the UK.

11:52, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: Yes the pastry is out again to explain the molecular science

11:53, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: How small can you make machinery? At least 1,000 times thinner than a strand of hair. A magnifying glass is used to amplify in front of journalists

11:55, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: The 2016 Chemistry Laureates succeeded in linking molecules together to design a tiny lift, motors & miniscule muscles - breakthrough made in 1983 by Jean-Pierre Sauvage used a copper ion to interlock molecules using a mechanical bond

11:56, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: The next big breakthrough was in 1991 when Fraser Stoddart created a molecular shuttle that could move along an axle in a controlled manner

11:57, 5 October 2016


The laureates of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

The laureates of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

11:58, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: Scientific timeline..In 1999, Ben Feringa builds the first molecular motors

11:59, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: We are now being shown a molecular four wheel drive car - "they have really mastered motion control atoms"

12:03, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: Now we come to what the science can be used for.

12:03, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: "The future will show us"

12:04, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: "Can you hear me?" - yes- they're now talking to one of the laureates

12:05, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: Bernard L Feringa - "A great surpise, shock and honoured - very emotional" - it was also a shock when his motor moved

12:07, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: Bernard L Feringa explains the practical uses of his molecure machines in the future (robots and stuff!)

12:09, 5 October 2016


More baked goods being used to explain the science behind the prize.

More baked goods being used to explain the science behind the prize.

12:14, 5 October 2016

Dave Russell, reporter, Radio Sweden: And Bernard L feringa has now finished the phonecall with the Nobel Committee keen to wrap up and get on with the individual interviews. Our reporter Ulla Engberg will bring you reaction which you can hear on our homepage. Bye for now.

12:15, 5 October 2016


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