Du måste aktivera javascript för att sverigesradio.se ska fungera korrekt och för att kunna lyssna på ljud. Har du problem med vår sajt så finns hjälp på http://kundo.se/org/sverigesradio/

Boxing Day bandy: a Swedish tradition

Published måndag 26 december 2016 kl 09.00
Historian: It's part of the festivities of coming home
(3:47 min)
Two Swedish bandy players facing off in Stockholm's Zinkensdamm Stadium.
1 av 2
Two Swedish bandy players facing off in Stockholm's Zinkensdamm Stadium. Credit: Jessica Gow / TT.
A bandy fan holding up a briefcase with a logo from Stockholm's Hammarby team.
2 av 2
A bandy fan holding up a briefcase with a logo from Stockholm's Hammarby team. Credit: Mark Earthy / TT.

Looking for things to do during the holidays? Why not check out a bandy match this Boxing Day.

On Monday, December 26 Sweden traditionally hosts numerous matches of the sport, which is similar to land hockey played on an ice rink.

It's called "Annandagsbandy" in Swedish and it's a key day in the distinctly Swedish sport.

Torbjörn Andersson is a sports historian at Malmö University who is writing a book about bandy. He says the day represents the psychological start of the bandy season.

"The Boxing Day tradition started in the 1950s but it became more popular within the last 20 years," he tells Radio Sweden. "It's really part of a celebration of Swedish nature and the cold."

Andersson says another tradition is for fans to carry in a briefcase containing a thermos that's often filled with "glögg", Swedish mulled wine, or coffee spiked with snaps, a strong, flavored aquavit.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
Har du frågor eller förslag gällande våra webbtjänster?

Kontakta gärna Sveriges Radios supportforum där vi besvarar dina frågor vardagar kl. 9-17.

Du hittar dina sparade avsnitt i menyn under "Min lista".