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Behaviour strategist: Sweden should have its own 'nudge unit'

Published fredag 13 oktober kl 14.31
Ida Lemoine: We help individuals go in the right direction
(7:51 min)
Ida Lemoine set up The Behaviour Lab (Beteendelabben) with colleagues and works with Nudge theory, coined by this year's Nobel prize winner in Economics, Richard Thaler.
Ida Lamoine set up The Behaviour Lab (Beteendelabben) with colleagues and works with Nudge theory, coined by this year's Nobel prize winner in Economics, Richard Thaler. Credit: Dave Russell/Radio Sweden

The Swedish government should have its own 'nudge unit' to allow for behavioural psychology to shape public policies. That's the view of behavioural strategist Ida Lemoine, who tells Radio Sweden that 'a little nudge in the right direction can change our behaviour'.

The awarding of this year's Nobel prize in economics to Richard Thaler has brought nudge theory into the spotlight.

Economist Richard Thaler's best-selling book Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth and Happiness, has led to nudge policy units at government level in the United States and the UK.

Economic strategist Ida Lemoine is managing director of The Behaviour Lab (Beteendelabben), which works toward sustainable behavioural change, using psychology, behavioural economics and design.   

She tells Radio Sweden about some of the projects they are working on in Sweden, from clothing to eating habits, and how the understanding of human behaviour can be a key ingredient for many public policies. 

"Everything is trying to affect us in one way," says Lemoine, citing marketing, regulations, policies and taxes as examples. "I don't know why people get so stressed about nudging. You could make it transparent as well, and make it more visible," she goes on to say.

Listen to the interview by clicking on the link above.

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