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Radio Sweden Thursday

Published torsdag 28 september 2006 kl 12.42
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Jakob Von Uexkull and Marianne Andersson present the recipients of this year’s Right Livelihood Awards.
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The recipients of this year’s Right Livelihood Award are announced honoring pioneers for justice, truth and peace-building.

What is the future of Swedish? How is the language developing and what factors are impacting its development? Radio Sweden investigates.

And later on in the program we join Bill Schiller for ”Nordic Lights.”  In this edition:

  • a poison dumping ship blocked in Estonia
  • a Norwegian atomic reactor shut down
  • environmental protests in Iceland
  • a Latvian bid to head the United Nations
  • suspected terrorists rounded up in Denmark
  • a famous stolen Norwegian art piece back on display

Closing Music: Lena Phillipsson ”Lena Anthem”

Four winners have shared this year’s Swedish-organised Right Livelihood Award, which is often dubbed the alternative nobel prize.The accolade is given to people who’ve worked for justice, truth or peace-building. The recipients for 2006 are American Daniel Ellsberg, whose whistle-blowing helped end the Vietnam war, Ruth Manorama who’s recognised for her efforts to achieve equality for Dalit women in India, and the International Festival of Poetry in Columbia’s violent city Medellin. The foundation’s honorary award has gone to Chico Whittaker Ferreira for his work in strengthening democracy in Brazil.

Jakob Von Uexkull founded the award and tells Radio Sweden’s Alexander Schmidt Hiorschfelder the jury had difficulty agreeing on the winners:

How is the Swedish language withstanding internal and external pressure in its development? What is its future and will it survive at all? These were some of the questions discussed at a major conference this week to mark the European Language Day. Azariah Kiros attended the conference and asked some of the participants to share their thoughts about the status of the Swedish language:

Time now for a look at Sweden’s Nordic nieghbors. Here’s Bill Schiller with ”Nordic Lights”:

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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