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Network Europe - a partnership of Europe’s leading international broadcasters.

Published söndag 15 oktober 2006 kl 05.30
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Anti-North Korea rally in Seoul, 13 October 2006.
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Anti-North Korea rally in Seoul.
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Always on Alert
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Anna Politkovskaja
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With North Korea touting its nuclear capability, condemnations and sanctions are on the lips of European leaders.

Russian journalist Anna Politkovskaja is mourned from Dresden to Stockholm. Colleagues across Europe say her murder was a blow to the freedom of the press in Russia.

”Na zdravi!” is too common a phrase amongst women in the Czech Republic as alcoholism soars.

And a few middle-of the night phone calls let some people know that they’ve entered the hallowed halls of Nobel Laureates.

More:

Nuclear North Korea

North Korea’s nuclear ambitions are clear but how is the international community responding? Experts fear a slippery slope. Shannon Kile from SIPRI, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute joins us on the program.  Kile says that now the genie has been let out of the nuclear bottle, Europe should wish for two things: ”The first thing is a cessation of further nuclear tests by North Korea and the second thing, is it needs to be part of a coordinated international response to what North Korea has done.”

Sweden, along with Switzerland has had a presence in the demilitarized zone separating North and South Korea since 1953. Commander Mats Fågelmark, Deputy Head of the Swedish Delegation of the Neutral Nations Supervising Commission, describes the current situation.

Legacy: Fight for Freedom of the Press

Radio Netherlands brings a 1995 interview with Anna Politkovskaja out of its archives for us.  The murdered Russian investigative journalist was mourned internationally this week.

Bilateral Deliberations Foster Russian-German Ties

Energy security, North Korea’s nuclear crisis and the killing of a leading Russian investigative reporter dominated talks between German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Russian president Vladimir Putin. The two leaders met in the Eastern German city of Dresden on Tuesday.

Stockholm Calling

A few middle-of the night phone calls let some people know that they’ve entered the hallowed halls of Nobel Laureates. American Edmund Phelps took the 2006 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences.  He said, ”Well, once my wife woke me up and said that I had an international call and I looked at the clock and I saw it was a few minutes after six ... and I knew it was Monday ... so those were all clues that maybe it was Stockholm calling.”

”Na zdravi!”

In the Czech Republic doctors are sounding the alarm: the number of women alcoholics in the country has been increasing sharply. In fact, in 2005 the number of women who entered Czech clinics with an alcohol abuse problem was twice as high as a decade previously. What’s more, medical studies reveal that the increase of problem drinking in the female population is much sharper than that among males.

Adieu to Counterfeit Cigarettes

French custom authorities have crushed and burnt nine thousand tons of counterfeit cigarettes. They were part of the four containers, 37 tons of cigarettes, seized in April 2005 in the northern port of Le Havre: that’s one point eight million packs, worth more than nine million euro. It was the biggest seizure of counterfeit tobacco in France.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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