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Carl von Linnés one time home of Uppsala remains a scientific hot spot
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Radio Sweden Tuesday

Police are hunting gangs who’ve tricked or kidnapped boys from Britain into slave-labour here in Sweden.

Lawyers are blaming police for failing to combat the increasingly common incidence of threats of physical violence, and actual attacks on witnesses due to testify in court.

From the Human Protein Atlas to a saint’s identity: the one time home of Carl von Linné continues to be a beacon on the scientific map.

Closing Music: Andreas Johnson ”Waterfall”

Police are hunting gangs who’ve tricked or kidnapped boys from Britain into slave-labour here in Sweden. Some have already been rescued after being forced to work for 15 hours a day as builders, while being virtually held prisoner in squalid conditions and often without food and water. Police Spokesman Ulf Göranzon told Radio Sweden’s Tom McAlinden more about the trafficking:

Swedish lawyers are blaming police for failing to combat the increasingly common threats and actual attacks on witnesses due to testify in court. In one recent case a 24-year-old woman in Stockholm was assaulted for a second time, having testified in a murder case, even though she was on a witness protection program at the time. Mark Cummins has the details:

2007 has been a year blossoming with celebrations for the 300th anniversary of the birth of Carl von Linné. But while everyone here has been looking back at the achievements of the man known as the father of modern taxonomy, today’s scientists have been eager to show that his spirit lives on. Gaby Katz visits the alma mater of Sweden’s most famous son to find out what today’s Uppsala has to offer in the way of cutting edge science:

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