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Fredrik Neij flanked by his lawyer Peter Althin (left) and co-defendant Peter Sunde. Photo: Jessica Gow/Scanpix.

Pirate Bay turns to European Court of Human Rights

One of the founders of the file-sharing site the Pirate Bay is turning to the European Court of Human Rights to appeal his conviction.

Like his three co-defendants, Fredrik Neij was sentenced to fines and several months of imprisonment by the Court of Appeals, for promoting copyright infringement. The Swedish Supreme Court has refused to hear a further appeal.

Writing in an op-ed article in the newspaper Dagens Nyheter, Neij’s lawyer Jonas Nilsson says his client is going to Strasbourg. He compares the Swedish court’s ruling to finding the founder of the Swedish version of Ebay guilty of theft because someone has sold a stolen bicycle on the site.

Last week one of his co-defendants, Peter Sunde, asked to be pardoned by the Swedish government, citing health issues and work on a new website for micropayments as reasons.

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