The limit has been there to encourage students to focus on their studies. Photo: Bertil Ericson/TT
politics

Students allowed to work more while on benefit

The amount of money a student is allowed to earn without affecting the student benefit and the advantageous student loan will be increased by 30,000 crowns, Svenska Dagbladet reports. This would mean that a student, from next year, is allowed to earn just over 172,000 crowns per year, without any reduction in the student aid.

The students union find the raising of the limit "problematic". "We want the aim to be that full-time studies are full-time studies," the chairman Erik Arroy tells the news agency TT.

The argument to limit the amount of money a student is allowed to earn, in order to receive full financial aid, has been that a student should be concentrating on studying, and that too much work during the term would affect the students results. The liberal party wants to do away with this limit completely, and the government has already raised it once, in 2011.

The proposal to raise it again is part of the government budget, which will be presented within the next two weeks. "This is a way to encourage students' connection to working life," says Maria Arnholm, Deputy Education Minister.

The spokesperson for the Green Party, Gustav Fridolin, is in favour of raising the limit, but he is concerned that the proposal means that the Government also plans to freeze the student aid for the next three years.

"Today it is difficult to manage on the student aid, especially for many who have high rents or who start studying later in life when they perhaps already have a family and children. We must have a student aid system that is adapted this this. We can't just expect all students to work full time, alongside actually studying full time," he tells the news agency TT.

We can't just expect all students to work full time, alongside actually studying full time," he tells the news agency TT.

And the chairman of the National Students Union Erik Arroy says they are not against raising the limit, but that they see it as "problematic" that the government increases the incentives to work extra. "We want the aim to be that full-time studies are full-time studies," he tells the news agency TT.

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