Du måste aktivera javascript för att sverigesradio.se ska fungera korrekt och för att kunna lyssna på ljud. Har du problem med vår sajt så finns hjälp på https://kundo.se/org/sverigesradio/

Moderate Party scuppers 2022 Olympics bid

"We trust that before they take a decision they will look at where we are right now"
11 min
1 av 2
Feverish activity is taking place behind the door of the Swedish Olympic Committee. Photo: Kris Boswell/Radio Sweden
2 av 2
Some of the details in Thursday's presentation of the Stockholm 2022 "Urban" Winter Games

Stockholm's biggest political party has thrown its weight against the bid for the Winter Olympics in 2022 Friday. On Thursday the Swedish Olympic Committee presented the latest version of the plans, still a work in progress, in an attempt to tell Stockholm's politicians to hold off on deciding whether to support the bid or not. But the last dash attempt may not have worked as the majority of the Stockholm City Council have now annouced that they are against the bid. 

With both the Moderates and the Cristian Democrats also bidding against the Winter Olympics it means that parties holding 60 out of Stockholm city's 101 council seats are against the bid, thereby dashing the dream of a 2022 Winter Olympics in Sweden. 

Stefan Lindeberg, head of the Swedish Olympic Committee says that many of the local parties are basing their decisions on figures and plans presented six months ago, and that is unfair.

Many of the plans have since changed, he says, for example the slalom will no longer be held on a rebuilt ski-slope in the Stockholm area, but will join the other alpine-skiing events at the resort in Åre, cutting costs, the SOC claims.

Radio Sweden's Kris Boswell also spoke to him about the plans and hopes for Sochi, and in a games which is once again featuring in the headlines because of the host country's human rights record, we find out exactly what the athletes can and cannot do. Stefan Lindeberg says that political statements are not allowed in the Olympic arenas, according to Olympic rules, but athletes are free to say what they like in interviews, he says.

"We want the symbol of the Olympic field to be a symbol of respect, whatever other people think," he says.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
Har du frågor eller förslag gällande våra webbtjänster?

Kontakta gärna Sveriges Radios supportforum där vi besvarar dina frågor vardagar kl. 9-17.

Du hittar dina sparade avsnitt i menyn under "Min lista".