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seven in ten patients were completely cured

Swedish study gives hope to MS patients

Published torsdag 27 februari 2014 kl 11.33
"Most are not treated at all now"
(4:38 min)
The study showed that by first treating the patient with chemotherapy and then transplanting stem cells that create new blood cells could rid seven in ten people of the disease completely. Photo: Bertil Ericsson/TT

A unique Swedish study gives hope for patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, Swedish Radio News reports. The study shows that stem cell transplants could help up to nine in ten people suffering from the disease.

Researchers "re-programmed" sufferers' immune systems with stem cells that had been taken from the patients' own blood while they were in a healthy phase. the stem cells wored to fight back the symptoms during a period of greater suffering from MS:

The treatment was carried out on sufferers of aggressive inflammatory MS. Uppsala University Hospital writes that the study shows the treatment can be made without serious complications or risk of relapse.

Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease that affects the nervous system, but the study showed that by first treating the patient with chemotherapy and then transplanting stem cells that create new blood cells could rid seven in ten people of the symptoms of the disease completely.

The study, out of Uppsala University, has followed 48 patients for over ten years.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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