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King Carl XVI Gustaf waiting to hand out the awards. Next to Queen Silvia and Crown Princess Victoria. Photo Jonas Ekströmer / TT
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King Carl XVI Gustaf waiting to hand out the awards. Next to Queen Silvia and Crown Princess Victoria. Photo Jonas Ekströmer/TT.
Guests arriving at the Stockholm Concert Hall for the
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Guests arriving at the Stockholm Concert Hall for the award ceremony. Photo: TT.
Nobel Prize Laureates at the Stockholm Concert House for the award ceremony. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT
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Nobel Prize Laureates at the Stockholm Concert House for the award ceremony. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT.
Nobel Prize laureate Hiroshi Amano is awarded the physics prize. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT
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Nobel Prize laureate Hiroshi Amano is awarded the physics prize. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT.
The the physics laureates: Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, Shuji Nakamura and chemics laureate Eric Betzig. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT
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The the physics laureates: Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano, Shuji Nakamura and chemics laureate Eric Betzig. Photo: Jonas Ekströmer/TT.
Nobel Prize laureates for Medicine: John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edward Moser. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT
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Nobel Prize laureates for Medicine: John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edward Moser. Photo: Henrik Montgomery/TT.

Nobel Prizes awarded in Stockholm

Ulrika Björksten tells us more about the Nobel Prizes and Laureates in the Sciences
5:40 min

This year's 11 laureates in medicine, chemistry, physics, literature and economics have been awarded the Nobel Prizes by the Swedish King Carl XVI Gustaf. "It's fantastic feeling," Medicine laureate Edvard Moser told Swedish Television afterwards.

(The first picture is part of a photo reel that is updated live by the news agency TT).

"I appreciate that science is celebrated in this way," Moser said, admitting to having been "very, very nervous" when he was given the Nobel Prize.

At 7 p.m. the scientists, dignitaries, royalty and others were seated for the lavish banquet in Stockholm City Hall, which was broadcast live on Swedish TV.

To find out more about the winners, Radio Sweden spoke to Ulrika Björksten, head of Swedish Radio's Science Department, who tells us more about the winners in the Medicine, Chemistry and Physics categories.

"They are quite close to the intention of Alfred Nobel when he wrote his will, especially the physics prize. This year it is really an invention which is rewarded, the LED lamp which has enabled us to save an enormous amount of energy in our cities and which will also enable several parts of the globe which do not have electric lighting to get electric lighting."

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2014 was awarded jointly to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources".

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was awarded jointly to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy".

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded with one half to John O'Keefe and the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain".

Radio Sweden will also hear from literature laureate Patrick Modiano who spoke to Swedish Radio in his home.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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