Photo: Leif R Jansson/TT
The Öresund bridge connects Malmö to the continent. Photo: Leif R Jansson/TT

Police arrests - Suspects took refugees over the border

Swedish police say they have detained 14 people in the past week accused of smuggling migrants across the Öresund Bridge between Denmark and Sweden. And there is a warning for those volunteers with good intentions bringing refugees into the country.

Police spokesman Lars Forstell on Tuesday told news Agency AFP that those detained were suspected of illegally transporting migrants across the Öresund bridge from Copenhagen, Denmark, to Malmö, Sweden.

It wasn't immediately clear whether the suspects were part of organized smuggling networks or individuals who wanted to help migrants come to Sweden for humanitarian reasons.

On the Skåne police homepage, a warning was issued late Tuesday for those thinking of giving a helping hand to refugees by bringing them into Sweden, with good intentions or not.

It said: "Many people are looking to get into Europe and to Sweden to seek asylum. However, the person who helps people to travel illegally into Sweden may be suspected of the crime of human trafficking."

It continued: "Helping someone into Sweden illegally, is contrary to the Swedish Aliens Act, whether for financial reward or as a volunteer."

According to the Aliens Act, a person who intentionally assists a person to illegally enter or pass through Sweden can be sentenced for smuggling and given a fine or prison sentence. 

The Swedish Migration Agency says about 700 asylum-seekers have arrived in Malmö in the past week, most of them Syrians.

Police in the South region said that they have regular contact with the police in Denmark, the Swedish Customs Service and the Immigration Service to monitor the events in Europe with refugees.

Meanwhile, Danish officials say hundreds of migrants who have arrived in Denmark in recent days are trying to evade authorities there so that they can continue to Sweden.

Under European Union rules they are supposed to apply for asylum in the first EU country they enter.

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