Medical student Dilava Bingöl from Sweden comes to Keleti station in Budapest every day to volunteer after her classes. Photo: Firas Jonblat/SR
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Medical student Dilava Bingöl from Sweden comes to Keleti station in Budapest every day to volunteer after her classes. Photo: Firas Jonblat/SR
Some volunteers have brought painting material for the refugee kids to have something to do. Photo: Firas Jonblat/SR
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Some volunteers have brought painting material for the refugee kids to have something to do. Photo: Firas Jonblat/SR
There is a need for blankets, shoes and warm clothes. Photo: Firas Jonblat/SR
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There is a need for blankets, shoes and warm clothes. Photo: Firas Jonblat/SR
People are still camping out at Keleti station in Budapest. Photo: Firas Jonblat/SR
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People are still camping out at Keleti station in Budapest. Photo: Firas Jonblat/SR

Dilava from Sweden volunteers among refugees in Budapest

"They have been walking thousands of miles"
3:10 min

Refugees are still passing through Keleti train station in Budapest. One of the volunteers working to help them there is Dilava Bingöl, a medical student from Sweden.

Dilava Bingöl is medical student from Sweden, currently studying in Budapest. She comes to the station every day, after classes, to help the refugees. Together with 14 other medical students, she collects money and shoes and give basic medical help to the refugees that keep coming in from the south.

The situation at the train station has calmed down significantly now compared to just a few days ago when thousands of families filled the station, camping out while waiting to go to Germany.

But there are still refugees coming, and Dilava and her friends are keeping busy. She is carrying a stethoscope around her neck, as she walks through the station.

"The stethoscope is to examine people who need medical help. But it is also just a symbol that I have medication. When they see the stethoscope, they relate to that.. (and realise) that this person might have some medical help or something and if they want paracetamol or ibuprofen, I can give them that," she says.

So what do people need when they come here?

"They need shoes, blankets, they need milk powder for the babies, they need vitamins and basic medication. And shoes. I emphasise shoes, because they have been walking I could say thousands of miles, so it is really, really important. And now that the cold is coming in, it is going to get colder, they really need warm clothing.." she says.


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