A model of a DNA molecule sitting on the table during the announcement of the Nobel chemistry prize. Photo: Fredrik Sandberg / TT
A model of a DNA molecule sitting on the table during the announcement of the Nobel chemistry prize. Photo: Fredrik Sandberg / TT

DNA repair and understanding the "delicacy of life"

"It's really an awesome thing"
0:20 min

If you have a rudimentary understanding of genetic evolution, you know that changes in our DNA sequence can result in favorable adaptations in living organisms through generations over long periods of time. But the research of Wednesday's chemistry prize winners showed that despite constant attack from the environment in the short term a cell's DNA is remarkably persistent, intact, and resilient. In fact, it repairs itself.

"If we start to understand the delicacy of how we evolved and how our life is maintained and the subtle mechanism for that, it's really an awesome thing," said Måns Ehrenberg, a professor in molecular biology at Uppsala University. "I think it could be just a deep happiness to know about, just to know how it works."

 

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