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Organizers hold anti-TTIP protests across Sweden

Published lördag 10 oktober 2015 kl 16.14
"The people who know about the deal are generally against it"
(1:14 min)
Demonstrators against TTIP in Falun, central Sweden. Photo: Matilda Eriksson Rehnberg / Swedish Radio.
Demonstrators against TTIP in Falun, central Sweden. Photo: Matilda Eriksson Rehnberg / Swedish Radio.

Hundreds of Swedes are expected to turn out across the country for protests against the planned trans-Atlantic free trade pact TTIP.

TTIP, or the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, is a hotly contested free trade deal between the European Union and the United States that critic say is anti-democratic and would lower food safety, working and environmental standards if passed.

Organizers have scheduled public rallies in Stockholm, Gothenburg, Malmö and in several other cities on Saturday.

"It's an undemocratic agreement that threatens to hand the powers over virtually all aspects of our lives to big corporations," Brenda El Rayes, a campaigner for the Swedish group Skiftet, which opposes the deal, tells Radio Sweden.

The protests were part of a week-long push throughout Europe that began on the weekend. On Saturday, hundreds of thousands of people marched in Berlin against the deal.

In Stockholm's central Mynttorget square, an afternoon rally was set to feature Green Party member of parliament Carl Schlyter and representatives of the cosmetic company LUSH speaking out against the plan.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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