After bringing in tighter border controls, Sweden is now readying for internal checks and deportations. Photo: Emil Langvad/TT
After bringing in tighter border controls, Sweden is now readying for internal checks and deportations. Photo: Emil Langvad/TT

Border police chief: rise in deportations will require staff to double

"There will be a substantial increase in the number of failed asylum seekers"
2:37 min

After Sweden's Home Affairs Minister told police to prepare for an uptick of deportations for failed asylum applications, the head of border police Patrik Engström says his force can plan for this but will need to be beefed up.

He says the government's instructions to the police focus on being quick to act when someone gets their refugee application turned down.

There are 1,000 people working with border policing in Sweden, although not all are police officers. Engström estimates that this number will have to double, eventually.

But will the government cough up the money needed for a doubled border police? "Well, hopefully," says Engström, who adds that now his force has made their needs clear, the government's normal budget work will start.

A lot of the work that Engström sees in the future is about coordinating better with other agencies and becoming more effective in that way.

He tells Radio Sweden that in many areas there is already more resources going to border work.

And he says that if the figure of 80,000 people with rejected asylum cases proves to be correct, then it'll probably mean about 30,000 to 25,000 deportation cases for his force, and with this happening over the next 3 to 4 years.

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