A jubilant Olivia Schough, pictured after her team qualified for the Olympics. Schough scored the goal Sweden needed in Wednesday's match in Rotterdam, to tie against the Netherlands. Jonas Ekströmer / TT
A jubilant Olivia Schough, pictured after her team qualified for the Olympics. Schough scored the goal Sweden needed in Wednesday's match in Rotterdam, to tie against the Netherlands. Credit: Jonas Ekströmer/TT

Women's soccer team Olympics-bound

1:51 min

The Swedish national women's soccer team qualified Wednesday night for the 2016 Summer Olympics, after tying in a dramatic match against the Netherlands, in Rotterdam, 1-1.

"It's a relief. We had a tough time out there and didn't play good football, but what took us to the Olympics is that we fought," said the team's coach Pia Sundhage to Channel 5.

The Netherlands scored the first goal of the game, just five minutes into play, with a goal from Vivianne Miedema. But at the very end of the first half, Olivia Schough of Sweden managed to collect a bad pass made by the Dutch player Kelly Zeeman, and scored the tying goal.

Swedish Radio Sports News expert, Richard Henriksson, called the goal a "big present" from the Dutch team, "which played a much better first half than Sweden." He said the Swedish team is "far from ready to tussle for medals in the Olympics", but that he hopes they can build on the foundation they've put in place.

Since 1996, when the Swedish women's soccer team qualified for the Olympic games in Atlanta, they have been part of every summer Olympics, and for the first time ever, both the Swedish men's and women's teams will compete in the same Olympic Games.

Brazil, Colombia, France, Germany, South Africa, Zimbabwe, New Zealand, Canada, the US, Australia and China have also qualified. The teams will be divided into three groups of four teams each, and the groups will be decided by lottery in April 14, in Rio de Janeiro.

The Olympics will be held in several cities in Brazil in August, including Rio and São Paulo.

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