Jonas Frycklund, economist at Svensk Näringsliv. Photo: Loukas Christodoulou/SR
1 av 2
Jonas Frycklund, economist at Svensk Näringsliv. Photo: Loukas Christodoulou/SR Credit: Loukas Christodoulou
Jesper Hansson, forecaster, Konjunkturinstitutet. Photo: Loukas Christodoulou/SR
2 av 2
Jesper Hansson, forecaster, Konjunkturinstitutet. Photo: Loukas Christodoulou/SR Credit: Loukas Christodoulou/SR

Asylum seekers' effect on Swedish economy

"The effect is of a Keynesian stimulus"
3:58 min

How has the recent record number of asylum seekers affected the Swedish economy? The answer is more complicated than you might think.

State spending on services for migrants has boosted the economy, and Swedish growth is at 4.1 percent for 2015, double the average for the EU.

Jesper Hansson is the head of forecasting at the National Economic Institute. He says Sweden has finally left behind the troubled time that started with the financial crisis of 2008, and expects the government to borrow now during the crisis, then later balance the books.

But just because the economy as a whole is doing well, it doesn't mean people in Sweden are all doing better or feeling richer.

Jonas Frycklund is an economist at the Swedish Confederation of Enterprise. He says that because the population is rising so fast GDP growth per head is actually getting lower.

So the current Social Democrat and Green government could steer Sweden through the crisis all the way to economic growth, but still face a political backlash in the 2018 general elections.



Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
Du hittar dina sparade avsnitt i menyn under "Min lista".