Atefeh lives on a farm with trotting horses.
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Atefeh lives on a farm with trotting horses. Credit: Shakila Edizada/Sveriges Radio
Atefeh works hard to focus on her studies.
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Atefeh works hard to focus on her studies. Credit: Shakila Edizada/Sveriges Radio
Atefeh hopes to become a dentist or a vet.
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Atefeh hopes to become a dentist or a vet. Credit: Shakila Edizada/Sveriges Radio
Atefeh travels 1,5 hours to get to school in the morning.
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Atefeh travels 1,5 hours to get to school in the morning. Credit: Shakila Edizada/Sveriges Radio
Coming alone to Sweden

Atefeh is one of the few unaccompanied girls who seek asylum in Sweden

Atefeh: Like all other unaccompanied minors, I am stressed
4:36 min

Most of the unaccompanied minors who apply for refugee status in Sweden are boys, but last year 3,000 girls came to Sweden without their parents. Teenager Atefeh is one of them.

Atefeh is one of five unaccompanied minors staying with a family, who lives on a farm outside Norrköping.

"We have a good relationship," she says. "We talk to each other. They ask how things were at school, what we had for lunch. We eat together like a family."

She is originally from Afghanistan and came to Sweden a year ago, from Iran.

"Like all other unaccompanied minors I am stressed. I am afraid that they will send me back to Afghanistan. I know nothing about Afghanistan and I don't have anyone there either," she says.

But Atefeh works hard to concentrate on her studies, and tries to have a positive outlook on life. She is looking forward to spring and summer, when she hopes to take up taekwondo again.

This story is part of a series about the everyday lives of unaccompanied minors in Sweden, young people who have come here without their parents.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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