David and Eva Sheingold, outside the Gothenburg Synagogue
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David and Eva Sheingold, outside the Gothenburg Synagogue. Credit: Phelan Chatterjee/Sveriges Radio
The Gothenburg Synagogue
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The Gothenburg Synagogue. Credit: Phelan Chatterjee/Sveriges Radio
Thomas will be joining a counter-rally.
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Thomas will be joining a counter-rally. Credit: Phelan Chatterjee/Sveriges Radio
A poster advertising a counter-rally called 'Gothenburg against Nazism'.
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A poster advertising a counter-rally called 'Gothenburg against Nazism'. Credit: Phelan Chatterjee/Sveriges Radio
Priest Lisa Westberg is organising a counter-rally in which poets and authors will read famous anti-Nazi texts.
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Priest Lisa Westberg is organising a counter-rally in which poets and authors will read famous anti-Nazi texts. Credit: Phelan Chatterjee/Sveriges Radio

Neo-Nazi march sparks painful memories among Gothenburg Jews

Eva Sheingold: This Yom Kippur, we have to stay in the synagogue all day
8:16 min

Gothenburg is preparing for a march by the neo-Nazi Nordic Resistance Movement (NRM) this Saturday, which coincides with the annual book fair, as well as Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the Jewish calendar.

The NRM seeks to put an end to democracy and immigration, repatriate foreigners and remove LGBTQ rights. They also deny the Holocaust and propagate the myth of global Jewish domination.

Last winter, three men with links to the NRM carried out bomb attacks in Gothenburg – two of which were aimed at refugee housing. Radio Sweden found that Saturday's march is causing worry among the local Jewish community.

The fact they are going to march on Yom Kippur on Saturday is appalling. This is exactly what the Nazis did in Germany. In our congregation we have many members who are survivors.

Eva Sheingold, who works for the Jewish Congregation in Gothenburg, explained that the congregation usually takes regular walks through the city during Yom Kippur, in between prayer sessions. This year, they will be staying indoors, due to the march.

A number of people in the path of the march told Radio Sweden they would be joining counter-protests. "For the first time I think I'll join in," said Afraz, a local resident. "I'm a non-political person, but this is about my city, my family and the people around."

There were also fears of violence coming from anti-Nazi protesters and the far-left. Priest Lisa Westberg, an organiser of 'Words for resistance and humanity', a counter-rally in which authors and poets will be reading famous anti-racist texts, said she was urging people to keep counter-protests peaceful.

Our journalism is based on credibility and impartiality. Swedish Radio is independent and not affiliated to any political, religious, financial, public or private interests.
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