The English novelist Kazuo Ishiguro is the 2017 Nobel Literature laureate.
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The English novelist Kazuo Ishiguro is the 2017 Nobel Literature laureate. Credit: Evan Agostini
Sara Danius, the permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy, announced the winner of this year's Nobel Literature Prize.
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Sara Danius, the permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy, announced the winner of this year's Nobel Literature Prize. Credit: Alexander Larsson Vierth/TT
A display of Ishiguro's books sits on a table in the Stockholm Stock Exchange building, where the Swedish Academy is housed.
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A display of Ishiguro's books sits on a table in the Stockholm Stock Exchange building, where the Swedish Academy is housed. Credit: Phelan Chatterjee / SR

Kazuo Ishiguro wins Nobel Literature prize

Swedish Academy's Permanent Secretary: Mix of Jane Austen and Kafka
4:56 min

Kazuo Ishiguro has won the 2017 Nobel Prize for Literature. The British writer is best known for his novel The Remains of the Day, which was turned into a film starring Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson.

In making the announcement, the academy praised the work of the 62-year-old, "who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world".

Kazuo Ishiguro's work is most associated with the themes of memory, time, and self-delusion.

His novel Never Let Me Go was made into a film with Carey Mulligan and Andrew Garfield.

The 2017 Literature laureate gave his reaction to the BBC

"It's a magnificent honour, mainly because it means that I'm in the footsteps of the greatest authors that have lived, so that's a terrific commendation."

The author Salman Rushdie gave his thoughts to The Guardian on his happiness for his friend winning the prize.

"Many congratulations to my old friend Ish, whose work I’ve loved and admired ever since I first read A Pale View of Hills. And he plays the guitar and writes songs, too! Roll over Bob Dylan," he told The Guardian

Kazuo Ishiguro, whose family moved to England from Japan when he was five years old, has written eight books, as well as scripts for film and television. He is a British citizen and his work has been translated into over 40 languages.

Ishiguro's first novel in ten years, The Buried Giant (2015) explores how memory relates to oblivion, history to the present, and fantasy to reality.

He is the tenth British writer to win the Literature prize.

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